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Why are values important?

Values are the things we believe in and stand for. Values motivate us and inspire us to be a better person.  When we align the way we live and operate on a daily basis with the values that we consider important, we feel a greater satisfaction with our life. By being aware of your values you can be in control and make better decisions in your life.

Why are values important?

Values are the underlying beliefs that shape our attitudes and guide our behaviour. Values are the standards we’d like to live by.  Values influence our decisions and actions and ultimately determine the quality of our lives.  Values are powerful motivating factors in our lives, so much so that throughout history people have been prepared to die for their values.  

“Values motivate us and inspire us to be a better person …”

We each have our own set of values.  They are very individual, like fingerprints. We all live by our own set of values. And they rarely change during our lifetime. We might swap the order or priority of our values at different stages of our life, but we’re slow to change our underlying values.

Values motivate us and inspire us to be a better person.  When we align the way we live and operate on a daily basis with the values that we consider important, we feel a greater satisfaction with our life.

Values are important because they guide our decisions and behaviour. When making a decision that’s against our values, we feel uncomfortable.

 

What are your values?

What are the values you use to guide your life?  Here are some questions which may help you identify some of the values that are guiding your behaviour at work:

1.  How do you react in difficult situations?

Think about situations when things haven’t gone according to plan, the moments when someone has disagreed with your decisions.  The way you handle these kinds of situations conveys an impression about your values.

2.  How do you spend your time?  

You can identify a person’s values by how they spend their time. We allocate our time to the things we consider most important to us. Check where you are spending your time each day and what this says about you.

3.  How do you spend your money?

Look at where you have been spending your money and think about what this says about you. The way we spend money shows others what we value.

4.  What questions do you ask? 

Are your questions focused on targets, expenses, progress or people?  What do your questions say about your values?

5.  What things do you measure? 

Again, look at the things you measure at work to determine how well you are doing. What’s the focus of your evaluations and how does this reflect your values?

6.  How do you reward those you work with?

Here’s another area where the way we operate informs others about our values. How and what are you rewarding at work and do these match your values?

Insight doesn’t necessarily change behaviour. Now that you’ve recognised some of the things you value, think about the choices and behaviours you’d like to change.

Draw on your values to guide your decision-making and actions. We work best when what we’re doing aligns with what we value.